Using Braingate Technology (BCI) for Recognizing Emotion and Control a Device

Authors(6) :-Anand Manikpure, Nihal Tadas, Aishwary Gawande, Mahesh Gudadhe, Dr. Narendra Narole, Prof. Ganesh Padole

Stroke is the main source of long haul inability in grown-ups and influences around 20 million individuals for each year. Five millions stay impeded and subject to help with day-by-day life. Almost 30% of all stroke patients are younger than 60. Different ailments bringing about loss of motion at such early age incorporate Multiple Sclerosis (MS), influencing in excess of 2.5 million individuals around the world, or spinal string damage (SCI) with 12.1 to 57.8 cases for each million. BPI, the disturbance of the upper appendage nerves prompting a limp loss of motion of the hands, influences a large number of individuals consistently. Immobile patients are additionally called as "secured" patients. Because of a stroke brain damage, cerebral degenerative neurological ailment, for example, amyotrophic sidelong sclerosis their whole framework is incapacitated. The main beam of expectation is as of now the improvement of brain-computer interfaces (BCI), an immediate correspondence pathway between the brain and an outer gadget that records neural procedures. This gadget is utilized to assist those with serious handicaps, for example, the individuals who have lost the control of their appendages and other substantial capacities. There is a computer chip, which is connected into the brain of the patient, to screen the brain movement. This gadget can perceive patient's expectation by breaking down their brain action.

Authors and Affiliations

Anand Manikpure
BE Scholars, Department of Electronics Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Nihal Tadas
BE Scholars, Department of Electronics Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Aishwary Gawande
BE Scholars, Department of Electronics Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Mahesh Gudadhe
BE Scholars, Department of Electronics Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India Assistant Professor, Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Dr. Narendra Narole
Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Technology, Rajiv Gandhi College of Engineering and Research, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
Prof. Ganesh Padole

SCI, BCI, EEG, CNS, Electroencephalography

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Publication Details

Published in : Volume 3 | Issue 4 | March-April 2018
Date of Publication : 2018-04-30
License:  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Page(s) : 372-378
Manuscript Number : CSEIT1833351
Publisher : Technoscience Academy

ISSN : 2456-3307

Cite This Article :

Anand Manikpure, Nihal Tadas, Aishwary Gawande, Mahesh Gudadhe, Dr. Narendra Narole, Prof. Ganesh Padole, "Using Braingate Technology (BCI) for Recognizing Emotion and Control a Device", International Journal of Scientific Research in Computer Science, Engineering and Information Technology (IJSRCSEIT), ISSN : 2456-3307, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp.372-378, March-April-2018.
Journal URL : http://ijsrcseit.com/CSEIT1833351

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